A tentative agreement is a term used in collective bargaining negotiations to refer to a proposed agreement that has been reached by the parties involved. It serves as a preliminary agreement that outlines the key terms and conditions of the final contract.

A tentative agreement is not a final contract and is subject to further discussion, revisions, and approval by all parties involved. It serves as a starting point for negotiations and allows all parties to have a clear understanding of the terms and conditions that will be included in the final agreement.

A tentative agreement is typically reached after several rounds of negotiations between the parties involved. It is important to note that while a tentative agreement has been reached, it does not mean that a final agreement has been reached. There is still more work to be done before a final deal is struck.

Once a tentative agreement has been reached, it is typically reviewed by all parties involved to ensure that everyone is in agreement with the terms and conditions outlined in the proposal. If any changes are needed, negotiations may continue until an agreement is reached that satisfies all parties involved.

In some instances, the tentative agreement may be rejected by one or more parties involved, which could result in further negotiation or even the possibility of a strike or lockout. However, in most cases, a tentative agreement serves as a starting point for productive negotiations, leading to a final contract that everyone is satisfied with.

In summary, a tentative agreement is a proposed agreement that has been reached by the parties involved in a collective bargaining negotiation. It outlines the key terms and conditions of the final contract but is subject to further discussion, revisions, and approval by all parties involved. A tentative agreement serves as a starting point for negotiations and allows all parties to have a clear understanding of the terms and conditions that will be included in the final agreement.